Article Content for The Alamo

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The Alamo today
Battle Map Click to hide  Virtual Tour locations Click to view a 360° panorama of The Long Barrack.

Long Barrack 360° Panorama

Click to view a 360° panorama of the Alamo Wall of History.

Wall of History 360° Panorama

Click to view a 360° panorama of The Alamo Garden.

Alamo Garden 360° Panorama

Click to view a 360° panorama of The Church and Gift Shop exteriors.

360° panorama of The Church and Gift Shop exteriors.

Click to view a 360° panorama of The Alamo front exterior.

360° panorama of The Alamo front exterior.

Click to view a 360° panorama of The Alamo Church entrance.

360° panorama of The Alamo Church entrance.

Click to view a 360° panorama of The Alamo Church Monks' Burial Ground.

360° panorama of The Alamo Church Monks' Burial Ground.

Click to view a 360° panorama of The Alamo Church Sacristy.

360° panorama of The Alamo Church Sacristy.

Click to view a 360° panorama of The Alamo Church.

360° panorama of The Alamo Church.

Click to view a 360° panorama of The Alamo History Walk.

360° panorama of The Alamo History Walk.

Click to view a 360° panorama of The Alamo Fountain.

360° panorama of The Alamo Fountain.

Click to view a 360° panorama of the Cavalry Courtyard.

360° panorama of the Cavalry Courtyard.

Click to view a 360° panorama of The Alamo Amphitheatre.

360° panorama of The Alamo Amphitheatre.

Battle Map Click to show Virtual Tour locations
Virtual Tour Click to learn more about where Travis was killed.

Travis Killed Here

According to eyewitness reports from his slave Joe, William Barret Travis was killed on the North Wall in the very early moments of the final assault.
Click to learn more about Bowie's sick bed.

Bowie Sick Bed

On February 24, 1836 – two days into the siege – James Bowie fell ill and William B. Travis assumed command of the Alamo.  Bowie was taken to a bed in the galera, or Low Barrack to recuperate.  His condition worsened as the siege continued.  It is in this bed that he most likely died, most likely during the final attack.
Click to learn more about where the wall gave in.

The Wall Gives In

During the final assault, the North Wall was the first to breach here as Mexican soldiers poured into the Alamo compound.  Columns attacking other walls converged on this point and the outcome was unavoidable.
Click to learn more about the Sacristy.

The Sacristy

Here, the women and children of the Alamo sought protection during the siege and battle.  An interior room of the Alamo church, with walls approximately 3 feet thick, the Sacristy was one of the safest areas of the entire fort.  After the last stand of male defenders took place in the Alamo church, Mexican troops found the women and children hiding here.
Click to learn more about The Long Barrack (Convento)

The Long Barrack (Convento)

One of the oldest parts of the San Antonio de Valero mission, the Long Barrack served as the convento for the Spanish priests and administrators during the mission period.  It was also the location of the first hospital in Texas when a military infirmary was established here for the Alamo de Parras Company in 1805.  The bloodiest, hand-to-hand fighting occurred here in the 1836 battle.  It is now the Alamo museum.
Click to learn more about the 18-pounder

The 18-pounder

The west wall of the Alamo overlooked the town of Bexar, and consequently, was the location of the largest gun owned by the defenders in 1836. The 18-pounder cannon was one of the largest pieces of artillery in the area and made the Alamo a significant threat to Mexican forces. It is with this cannon that William Barret Travis most likely answered Santa Anna’s demand for surrender as mentioned in the famous “Victory or Death” letter.  Today, the entrance to the Riverwalk is in this area.
Click to learn more about Fortin de Cos (Little Fort Cos)

Fortin de Cos (Little Fort Cos)

This cannon emplacement on a ramp to the rear of the Alamo church was named to mock the former commander of the Alamo, Martin Perfecto de Cos.  Cos had been defeated in the Battle of Bexar when Texians took the town and the Alamo in December 1835.  He returned with Santa Anna for the siege and final attack at the Alamo in spring 1836.  Captain Almaron Dickinson was in charge of this artillery position.  His wife Susannah and his baby girl Angelina sought refuge in the Sacristy just below the emplacement.  He died in the final assault after allegedly telling his wife, “Great God Sue, they’re in the walls.”
Click to hide Historic Points of Interest
Historic Map Click to show Historic Points of Interest

Modern Alamo Grounds »

Map detailing the modern Alamo grounds featuring 360° panoramic virtual tours.


Historic Alamo Battleground »

Map detailing the Alamo grounds during the 1836 battle featuring historic points of interest.